Pete Carroll

This tag is associated with 22 posts

Seahawks Cut Day 2013: Saying goodbye to Michael Robinson

Photo courtesy of Seahawks.com

Photo courtesy of Seahawks.com

Last night I found myself on the corner of FANatic and logical human. In that moment, and despite my internal GPS yelling “re-calculating”, my fandom got the best of me and I made a decision…head down emotion street.

Michael Robinson was my favorite.. A 12thMan favorite and probably the favorite of most of his teammates on this Seattle Seahawks team.

For those on social media last night that think I don’t understand the business of football you couldn’t be further from the truth. I understand the business of football very well. What I couldn’t get my arms around was Pete Carroll‘s apparent departure from the “best guy wins the position battle no matter what” deal. I find it hard to believe that Michael Robinson was not the best Fullback on this roster.

However, looking long-term I can’t escape the fact that the money saved by Michael Robinson leaving could help pay other players that are going to need big paychecks down the road. Guys like Richard Sherman, Brandon Browner and Earl Thomas come to mind.

Still, because I believe that Pete Carroll means what he says,  there has to be more to this decision than just money for other players later…Mike Rob must be hurt.

What made Michael Robinson unique was not just his pro bowl quality play on the field but his ability to bring us into the locker room like we’ve never been before.

I’ll admit I’m being selfish here and I’m okay with that.

That’s what got me. That’s what got me a tad emotional last night on Twitter and it’s what makes me sad today. That access is gone. Probably forever unless it’s produced professionally by the Seahawks media relations staff.  Even so, I would imagine it will never be quite as organic as when Michael Robinson walked around with his Real Rob report microphone.

Michael Robinson was more than the Seahawks fullback. He was more than just a replaceable leader on a football team. He was the perfect match for Pete Carroll’s new way of doing things and his walks around the locker room allowed us to see what Pete was building behind the scenes and be “All In”. It was amazing.

From John Moffitt’s hilarity to Marshawn Lynch‘s attempt to completely ignore the camera in seemingly every video, the team became more than just football players we cheer for on Sunday, they became actual people. It is because of that exposure I love the Seahawks even more today. Which for a fan of the team for over 30 years it’s crazy for me to say. I’m connected now on a different level.

So as a tribute to Michael Robinson I gathered some of my favorite youtube clips from his Real Rob report and as a Seahawks football player. I hope you guys enjoy.

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Richard Sherman is……

Seattle Seahawks' Richard Sherman (25) talks with New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady after an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Seattle. The Seahawks won 24-23. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Seattle Seahawks’ Richard Sherman (25) talks with New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady after an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Seattle. The Seahawks won 24-23. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

For me, the thirst for Seahawks victories consumed most of my late teens and have continued into my late 30’s.

I’ll be completely honest here, I’m a football purist. I loved Coach Holmgren’s approach because I always felt the best way to win was to have a team that was assembled with a few things in mind.

1. Talent
2. Character (Not Characters)
3. Competitive fire to be great

Matt Hasselbeck, Bobby Engram, and Walter Jones-to name a few-embodied that image and came painfully close to what would have been the most satisfying Superbowl victory I could have ever dreamed.

But they failed, and with that failure the Holmgren era slowly eroded into oblivion and the Seahawks fell back to earth..hard.

I know, this is old news, but I need to you to understand the lens I see “the perfect team” through.

Enter Pete Carroll and his strong sense of “why” that permeates the Seahawks organization at every level. Compete, Compete, Compete is paramount, and this approach has done amazing things for this franchise.

Players on this current Seahawks roster meet or exceed two of my personal prerequisites for team success, but there’s a sticking point.

Character vs characters..

I will never judge anyone without walking in their shoes first. But unwillingness to pass personal judgement does not mean that I’m blind to the distractions that this recent Seahawks team is experiencing and the player that brings the most of that to the forefront is Richard Sherman.

From his alleged and overturned PED issue, to the embarrassing ratings grabbing interview Skip Bayless suckered him into on national TV, to the consistent over the top trash talk, like it or not, Sherman has become the face of the Seattle Seahawks.

The big market media wouldn’t have it any other way.

Funny thing is, I’m a HUGE fan of Sherman. His abilities on the football field are – in my opinion – unmatched in the NFL. His play alters the sleeping patterns of opposing coaching staffs and his physicality demoralizes the majority of receivers.

However, the Seahawks need a lot less Richard Sherman bloviating on NFL network and ESPN, and waaaay more Russell Wilson being well…Russell Wilsonish.

We have one of the best leaders in the NFL who could be one of the best QBs in time that -next to Sherman- is completely overshadowed outside of Seattle. I have a big problem with that and also know how lucky we are to have a talent like Sherman on the roster.. Conflict much?

So I’m curious to hear what you think…Vote, and then I’d love to read your thoughts in the comment section below.

Seahawks Decide Against Bringing Thier Talents to Miami

Courtesy (AP)

Oh boy,

This game was a huge disappointment for Seattle. From defensive containment issues, to poor play calling on both the defensive and offensive side of the ball the result was hard to swallow.

This puts the playoffs into the dream category for Seattle, and puts tremendous pressure on the Pete Carroll regime to finish the season strong.

There’s a difference between flash and substance and the Seahawks have plenty of flash. It’s the substance that is keeping them from winning games they must win. The Seahawks need to find some middle ground in this area.

Russell Wilson: 21-27 yards, 2 TDs 125.9 Passer rating.

Wilson was everything for the Seahawks offense today. From his 21-27 224 yards, and 2 TDs, to his 38 clutch yards on the ground. The blame for this debacle can not be placed on Wilson at all. He was main reason game was close.

Seahawks offense: Points: 14 (Passing: 216 Rushing: 96) Lynch with only 46 yards.

The Seahawks game plan was abysmal.  The offensive line was man handled in the run game and the result was a total destruction of what the Seahawks were trying to do. The Dolphins were ready for the inside zone, play action, and crossing routes. Russell Wilson was  pretty much the lone bright spot today.

Note: I’m not ignoring the amazing Golden Tate catch.

Seahawks Defense: Allowed: 24 points, 435 Yards (Rushing: 189 Passing: 246)

The Seahawks did a good enough job for the majority of the game in every aspect. Time and time again the defensive line collapsed the pocket and forced quick throws by Ryan Tannehill. Reggie Bush (87 yards, 1 TD) was a minimal factor, but when they lost contain he burnt them badly including the crucial TD run. Something I talked about in my game preview.

However, later on in the game, the Seahawks looked worn down and continually went to a soft underneath zone. When pressure stopped getting close it allowed Tannehill to pick them apart. Very confusing game plan late to say the least. This was just another example of late game fizzles.

Special Teams:

Leon Washington‘s NFL record 8th kick return for a touchdown came at a great time. Credit to the kick return team for giving him a huge one-cut hole and nothing but green grass to the end zone. Jon Ryan was great again today and the punt and kick off teams came to play.

Coaching: 10 for 59 crucial yards.

Penalties, Penalties, and more penalties. These were killers for sure, but the biggest issue from a coaching standpoint was the refusal to utilize speed in the running game. The Dolphins are one of the better teams in the league at stopping inside runs yet the play calling stubbornly forced that very thing all day. Where was the creativity and adjustments after halftime? Why not try some outside zone with Leon Washington at least once? Why not give the Spread zone option more of a chance? We may never know.

From a defensive stand point, the decision to play soft underneath zones even when the pressure wasn’t getting home was baffling and I believe it cost Seattle the game in the end. Very disappointing loss in what is probably the nail in the Seahawks playoff coffin.

With remaining road games at Chicago and Toronto, the Seahawks will be kicking themselves for today’s debacle. Going two for two will be tough.

What are your thoughts on todays loss? Comment below and let’s discuss!

Sunday Matchup Focus: Seahawks vs Dolphins

Halip/Getty Images

Where: Sun Life Stadium, Miami
Time: Sunday, 1 p.m. ET (Fox)
Team Records: Seahawks (6-4); Dolphins (4-6)

The Seahawks, fresh of their much-needed bye week, head to Miami to face a struggling Dolphins team in what I consider a must-win game for Seattle’s playoff aspirations.

At 6-4, the Seahawks need to find a way to get 10 or more victories in what is turning out to be a tight NFC West race to the top with the San Francisco 49ers. If the Seahawks can’t take the division the 10-plus win goal should put them in the playoffs as a wild card team. But to do so Seattle must shake off their horrendous road record and win one or two on the road to finish the year.

For the Dolphins, a rested and hungry Seahawks team is the exact opposite of what they need right now. During their current three-game losing streak, the team has begun to show signs of imploding under positive expectations brought on by some unexpected early season success.

Keys to the game: Russell Wilson

1. Manage the game. The Seahawks may be facing a team with issues but one thing they do well is rush the passer and stuff the run. Miami pass rusher Cameron Wake is going to be an issue for Seattle all day long if Russell Wilson doesn’t get the Seahawks into manageable down and distances with savvy checks at the line of scrimmage. Wilson must diagnose and get the Seahawks into the right play or he’ll be in trouble.

2. Expose Dolphins coverage. Miami Cornerback Nolan Carroll has struggled mightily this season and should be ripe for another beating. Russell Wilson would be smart to find Carroll and target him until he proves it’s not a good idea.

Bottom Line: Wilson doesn’t have to be a beast for the Seahawks to win, he just needs to be careful with the ball and smart with his reads. Football doesn’t have to be hard, just find the matchup to exploit and go after it.

Keys to the game: Seahawks offense

1. Find daylight. The Seahawks are well-rested and that’s a good thing. The Dolphins boast a run defense that prides itself with shutting down the run. That just happens to be what the Seahawks like to do most. Marshawn Lynch and the Seahawks offensive line must fire out, and get movement on the Miami defensive front early on or it will have to be the Russell Wilson show.

 2. Screen game. The Seahawks have shown that they can utilize the screen game and have success and this game may require it. What they must avoid is relying on the receiver “alley” screen and try to add running back screens in the mix. The last thing the Dolphins want is Marshawn Lynch on the outside with a head of steam.

3. Avoid turnovers. Road game failures usually come down to mental errors and the Seahawks seem to struggle with those away from Seattle. If the Seahawks can play error-free football this Dolphins team may crack under the pressure. Not doing so gives the Dolphins hope.

Keys to the game: Defense

1. Pressure. I’ve been saying for a while that the Seahawks late bye week was going to be rough for the defense. They have been asked to carry this team for the better part of the season and over the past few games the wear and tear had begun to show. This had a direct effect on the amount of pressure they could muster. With the Seahawks injury free and well rested, look for defensive coordinator Gus Bradley to dial-up pressure and force Miami’s rookie QB Ryan Tannehill to fold under it.

Easy Pressure Target: Miami RT Jonathan Martin

2. Contain, Contain, Contain. Reggie Bush causes problems for teams because of his ability to bounce inside runs to the outside and beat contain to the corner. Seattle must play to the whistle and wrap and drive this man to the ground. When he bounces, the linebackers must be there to funnel Bush back into the teeth of the defense. If Reggie Bush gets free, he will put up yardage in bunches.

3. Avoid Penalties. Avoiding turnovers is paramount for road teams, but right up there on the list is penalties. When you play a team that struggles on offense like the Dolphins have been, you can’t extend their drives with mental errors. If the Seahawks play tough and clean this game should be decided by the third quarter.

Keys to the game: Special teams

1. Field position. This might be the biggest key for Seattle. If Seahawks stud punter Jon Ryan gets the opportunity to punt, his leg could be the difference in the game. The Dolphins are not designed to march up and down the field and pinning them deep gives the Seahawks offense even more opportunities to put points on the board.

Keys to the game: Coaching staff

1. Preparation. When you have two weeks to study yourself as well as your upcoming opponent the fact is there is no excuse for a poor game plan. Head coach Pete Carroll and staff must develop a plan of attack that exposes the Dolphins many offensive weaknesses.

2. Tempo.  For many reasons, the Seahawks rank near the bottom of the league on offense but Darrell Bevell plays a part on game day. Quick play calling means quicker huddles and more time for Russell Wilson to diagnose looks at the line of scrimmage.

3. Be multiple. At this point the NFL knows what the Seahawks are. They are a powerful inside zone running team led by a savvy rookie QB and an elite level defense who specializes in coverage, run stuffing and pressure.

On offense, the coaching staff must not allow players such as DE Cameron Wake and DT Randy Starks to disrupt with their penetration and must do so by varying their play calling. Balance equals unpredictable.

On defense, Gus Bradley must ensure the one big Miami weapon never sees a clear lane to run and pays for attempts to bounce outside with several Seahawks defenders waiting to lay the hit.

Bottom Line: This is a game the Seahawks should win despite their past issues on the road and considering the playoff implications, they’d better.

Prediction: Seahawks 21-13

Seahawks Decide Tied for Last in Division is Cool (Sam’s Visceral Reaction Week 4)

Photo: Tom Gannam / AP

It’d be easy enough for this entire reaction blog post here to simply be me typing in all-caps just one big, long curse word and hitting submit. I should do that, because the amount of effort that would take is about as much as the Seahawks put in against a team like the St. Louis Rams. I’ll hold off on that, but I’m sure there will still be some blue language here.

The game was a frustrating loss and continued to keep questions about rookie quarterback Russell Wilson‘s long-term viability as a starter front and center. Perhaps what’s worse, however, is that it’s at times unclear if the issues the ‘Hawks offense is having is because of QB play, because of the line collapsing in like a dying star, because the receivers don’t have the ability to get open down field or the coaching.

Perhaps it’s all those things.

This week, coach Pete Carroll made claims that he has called for a conservative offense because he is having a rookie QB helm the ship.

It’s mind-boggling that is the tact of a coach who allegedly believes in his starting quarterback considering the play of some of the other rookie starters out there. Robert Griffin III put up another huge game in Week 4 against Tampa Bay (or as I like to call them, the St. Louis Rams of the NFC South) with 323 passing yards, 43 rushing yards on seven carries for a TD. Miami’s Ryan Tannehill dropped 431 passing yards on the stout Arizona Cardinals defense. Cleveland Brown’s rookie QB Brandon Weeden tossed 320 yards over the Baltimore Ravens. Both Miami and Cleveland lost this week, and they’ve got their own issues, but the point here is that there is a huge difference in what appears to be the faith of the coaching staff of those teams versus the Seattle Seahawks. Pete Carroll can say whatever he wants to the media, but what we’re seeing on the field seems different.

What has me the most pissed off this week is that we simply should not have lost this game. It wasn’t the damned fake field goal (though if I hear a Fox announcer say “trickeration” ever again I’m going to kick a puppy) or even the three interceptions Wilson threw (they didn’t, largely, appear to be fully his fault).

I’m angry our coaching staff appears to simply not believe in the person they’ve asked to lead this team.

Today we saw some great flashes from Wilson in the first drive of the game. The quarterback was able to zip some passes to wide receiver Sidney Rice and our ground game was superb. When the Rams brought pressure, he got out of it and it was clear climbing the pocket wasn’t the answer.

After that, everything seemed to falter. Red zone touchdown scoring simply doesn’t exist for the franchise right now. The offensive line doesn’t have any inkling as to what pass protection seems to mean. Russell Wilson does not have the ability to climb the pocket and appears to have some type of fetish for the scrambling boot leg (including loss of yardage while being tackled in the backfield).

Today’s game made it hard not to think that Wilson’s height really has a large impact on his ability to make plays, most especially when his line fails him in protection and closes throwing windows. If he were taller would he be able to get the ball to wide open tight end Zach Miller at the two yard line?

It’s just very hard to know where exactly the offensive failure is right now.

I’ll tell you where it’s not, though: The failure sure as hell isn’t our running game. Beast Mode Marshawn Lynch and Robert Turbin (aka Turbo) are the shining stars of the offense. If Turbin had been given the 20 snaps Lynch did, he could have had 150 rushing yards today based on his pace. Marshawn, too, was extremely effective in his runs, including an 18-yard Skittles Scramble (that’s trademarked)  for a TD on the first drive.

But the Seahawks simply cannot rely on only the running game to win. What’s baffling is that, with such a successful ground game, the passing game should be all the more successful. And, yet, when Wilson is back to pass it’s like a different team is playing.

Frankly I better end this now. I’m so frustrated this week I’m not even sure where to go with this. Just a few quick snippet thoughts and then I’m going to mic drop and go eat some apple pie:

1) Despite how pissed I am, Wilson should still start. He needs better coaching support, better play from receivers and damned better pass protection. Let’s face it, we’re still 2-2. I don’t know that Matt Flynn would have fared any better and frankly Wilson has a far better chance of escaping when our offensive line plays like shit, which seems to be the norm right now on passing plays. I’ll change my tune quickly if I don’t see some changes at QB, however.

2) The left side of the line with Russell Okung and James Carpenter was great today in run blocking.

3) Bench Breno Giacomini. Two after-whistle unsportsmanlike penalties for 15 yards each are unacceptable. Period. During Carroll’s post-game press conference he attributed it to Giacomini playing the full play or some such shittery. Bullshit. When the whistle blows, stop playing. You’re hurting your team. And I’m going to kick a puppy.

4) Our defensive secondary are clearly stronger when they jam at the line. Zone coverage is a weak spot. Getting burned by the Rams really showed it, and really, really hurt.

That’s it. That’s all I’ve got. Next week we face a high-flying offense run by second-year star and big-ass cry baby Cam Newton over at the Carolina Panthers.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to go find a puppy.

Russell Wilson for President (And other overreactions I’m having)!

Russell Wilson EVERYTHING!!!

If the November elections were held today, Seattle Seahawks fans would elect rookie quarterback Russell Wilson not just to the presidency of this great nation, but as Emperor of the World!

My wife and I are expecting our next kid in February, and we’re likely going to name it Russell. The gender of the baby doesn’t matter.

And I’m also fairly confident Wilson can cure diabetes.

These overreactions brought to you by Top Pot Doughnuts, the official Hand-Forged Overreaction Dessert of the Seattle Seahawks!*

(*Full disclosure: Top Pot Doughnuts in no way endorses or advertises on this blog, but remember that one time Golden Tate totally stole some of those tasty treats? I just thought I’d bring that up for no reason at all.)

They may be exaggerations, but it is extremely likely if you watched the third Seahawks preseason game last night versus the Kansas City Chiefs you have had similar thoughts. Or feelings. Personally? I want to make love to the Seahawks. That’s my feeling, alright, Dad? I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!

Keep in mind these reactions are coming from an ardent supporter of Matt Flynn, who I still believe is quite talented and would do well as our starter. That’s what makes watching this QB “competition” so fantastic. No matter what happens, we’re far better off than last year.

But last night we got to see why Wilson was so coveted by Pete Carroll and John Schneider, and it appears that they really have wanted him to succeed and win the starting job since the evening they drafted him at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall. As Seattle Times reporter Danny O’Neil shared from the Seahawks live chat last night, it is also the case that “Every day I’m Russeling.”

Like many watching this four-part QB miniseries unfold, I was convinced that Wilson’s wonderful play during the initial two preseason outings against Tennessee and at Denver were due to playing against second and third stringers and players that aren’t even going to make the final roster of those teams. He was a shining star on the rise, but who may lose some luster against the big boys who start games. I was wrong, and so were plenty of others.

But I wasn’t adamantly against Wilson taking first-string snaps during the Chiefs game, and so I can haughtily say: “Na-na, na-na boo boo, stick your head in doo-doo.” And not really caring all that much who took the snaps, because I was pretty comfortable with either guy (though I still felt it was likely Flynn would be the starter no matter what), it made watching Wilson shine that much more lustrous (I’m using a lot of clichéd adjectives to seem impressive, here, you see).

Wilson had poise in the pocket, made intelligent throws and had enough balls to toss a few up in to traffic with confidence that his receivers would win the jump. And they usually did. We saw his mobility, and how he used his run game only when necessary or when he could take advantage of it, not because he was scrambling in a panic. There were a few minor hiccups: Some overthrows on finesse balls and throwing behind receivers a few times. Before you knew it though, he came back with a touchdown throw. Those misses didn’t look like rookie mistakes, they seemed like minor veteran errors that would inevitably corrected with points on the board a few plays later.

Now I’m taking a more aggressive tact on this whole QB battle. Wilson must start and anything else will end with Pete Carroll being the most loathed coach in the history of the Seahawks franchise (right behind Jim Mora, nobody will ever beat him for that spot). Carroll is the one who told fans he didn’t care about conventional wisdom and wanted to see what Wilson had. Now he’s seen it, as have countless thousands of others and it’s a pretty simple choice.

Tap the electric play of a rookie and know that we have a win-win situation with Flynn sitting right behind him. That is, of course, unless they trade Flynn away already.

We may still have Tarvaris Jackson, who we all know can maintain some semblance of game management, despite the fact he holds on to the ball so long it’s like he’s doing a monthly cancer screening on it.

More Reasons to Love the Hawks

Wilson wasn’t the only one with impressive play last night, and other rookie standouts are showing just how well John Schneider works an NFL draft. I’ll point to the most obvious, because I’m a basic fan, not a nerd, you  nerds.

Robert Turbin, with his Hulk-sized biceps, showed lightening speed through gaps while he out-ran Chiefs linebackers for a TD. For all the talk we heard about him still having to work on the basic one-step then through the hole stuff early in camp, he seems to have it down.

J.R. Sweezy man-handled opponents at the right guard spot, making another impressive show as he transitions from the defensive line to the offensive side of the ball. He mad huge gaps for the running backs and played so well that my wife and I will probably name our third child Sweezy.

And lest we not forget that the entire Seahawks defense is amazing, and appears to be making party plans to move from a top 10 defense to a top five.

There are plenty of things to be excited about with this 2012 iteration of the Seattle Seahawks. They may or may not be overreactions. It’s just exciting to see success after some lull years.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to get Russell Wilson’s face tattooed on my left ass cheek.

Welcome home Matthew Hasselbeck…

There are few things in sports that are quite like reunions with former players with massive amounts of supporters. That’s Matthew Hasselbeck, former and arguably the best quarterback that has suited up for the Seattle Seahawks franchise.
Hasselbeck stats in case you forgot:
GAMES: 138
COMPLETIONS: 2,559
COMPLETION %: 60.2
PASSING YARDS: 29,434
TDS: 174
GAME WINNING DRIVES: 19

Last year the Seahawks ranked 22nd in passing offense. This wouldn’t be so bad if that came with 10 wins, or if the QB that was selected to replace Hasselbeck didn’t play like, well..Tarvaris Jackson. I’ve been a supporter of Jackson from a leadership and heart standpoint (battled through awful offensive line play and  torn pectoral muscle most of year) but he doesn’t pass the eye test. He’s not as polished as Matt was under center for the Seahawks (patting the ball for 5 seconds, then throwing majority of his passes off back foot like a fade away jumper doesn’t help his case).

On Saturday, Seahawks fans will once again see Matt Hasselbeck running on to the Century Link Field , only this time in a Tennessee Titan’s jersey. While most fans will admit it was time for Hasselbeck to move on, the fact that we haven’t had the new “Matt” since he left has turned the QB situation into a full-fledged 12th Man soap opera.

The desperation is clear. Pete Carroll, and John Schneider have been busy building an outstanding defense..The additions of players like Earl Thomas, Kam Chancellor, Brandon Browner, Richard Sherman, Alan Branch, Jason Jones, Bruce Irvin, and more have catapulted this defense into championship caliber levels.
To be fair, Pete Carroll has decided to construct the Seahawk’s new offense the right way: by building from the offensive line out. Additionally, offensive additions like Marshawn Lynch and Doug Baldwin have brought serious excitement at times but we are still an unbalanced team to date, and that has led to fears that this great defense may be wasted much like the 49er’s before Jim Harbaugh arrived (I just vomited a little writing that).

Matt Flynn vs Russell Wilson vs Tarvaris Jackson

During camp you hear-read the daily “how do they look?” questions from fans with numerous “experts” in local and national media weighing in on who they thought looked like “the guy”. These assumptions and opinions have driven me slightly crazy. I say that only because the rep counts, 1st team, 2nd team, and play call sheets are only part of the story. What happens in the film room off the field is also HUGE and is not getting discussed. Also I’ll add that successes in practice at this point in camp either offensive or defensive, may have to do with familiarity with personnel and their weaknesses as well as the limited contact allowed. While I’m on this mini rant, I’ll say one last thing: We don’t know what metric Pete Carroll and staff are using to grade the QB’s. I’d imagine it was deeper than completion percentage during practice, hitch steps, TD counts, and release points. I’d submit that it’s possible to go 8-8 in 7 on 7 drills but grade out below average. Without having intimate knowledge of the playbook, and philosophies against various coverages, it is all wild speculation.

The point is I’m getting restless. I’m getting restless to once again have that feeling of confidence in the QB position. To know the guy taking snaps is “the guy” and won’t be shipped out next year for another guy, who is then shipped out for another (see Seattle from 92-2000). I don’t want to go through that again. Matt Hasselbeck spoiled us as a fan base. He was perfect for Seattle, and seeing him back on the field on Saturday picks at a scab that has yet to heal.

Matt Flynn will get the start on Saturday, and an entire fan base will be sitting on the edge of their seats to see if this Matt can show us just a glimpse of what the new and improved defense Pete Carroll has built deserves : A competent QB who won’t force them to make the play that wins the game. Kind of a tough spot for Matt Flynn, even if it is just the 1st pre-season game. But, “the guy” should rise to the challenge.

Let’s hope he can.

Go Seahawks!!

T.O. is a Seattle Seahawk.. I need a minute.

 

Get your Popcorn ready folks! (Courtesy AP)

I need a minute. Usually news such as this is given with a warning like: “You may want to sit down for this” or “are you holding anything sharp?”.  There are very few things I don’t like about the team currently residing in Seattle. I love the Coach. I love the fact he has built a great defense, and running game. And I love the tough as nails physicality he’s trying to install. That was up until a short while ago when Pete Carroll was abducted by aliens and returned with a small screw loose. (That’s the only thing that explains it)

In the past few months, he has signed Kellen Winslow (current pass catching TE Diva), Antonio Bryant (ex Diva now, cut Diva), Braylon Edwards (still wants to be Diva,Diva), and now…

Almost 39 yr old Terrell Owens (The Diva of them all) who hasn’t played in the NFL since his short stint with the Bengals in 2010. A bizarre ESPN filmed workout with 0 NFL teams in attendance, and a nasty situation with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League later, and he lands in Seattle on a one year deal (Contract details have yet to be released).

To say Terrell Owens has baggage is an understatement. He’s been wildly spectacular on the field (1st ballot HOFer) his entire career but his act in the huddle, on the sideline, in meeting rooms, and during the off-season have been crazy and over the top negative more often than not. To his credit though, he did manage to avoid setting the Bills and Bengals organization on fire..At least publicly.

Enter Matt Flynn, Tarvaris Jackson, and Russell Wilson. For Pete Carroll to subject his 3 headed race to the starting Seahawks QB position to a testy herd of needy pass catchers is bizarre, and almost cruel. Teams that add players like this need a towering and established vet leader at QB to control the huddle..Matt Flynn? Tarvaris Jackson? Russell Wilson?

I just don’t see it.

I said earlier today on twitter (check the timeline) that one of my concerns was the amount of reps available in practice that are going away from developmental players.. Ricardo Lockette, Golden Tate, Kris Durham and so on..Adding players who have not been through OTAs and will need to cram to consume the playbook means continuity with whatever QB Pete Carroll picks will be non existant..Don’t give me the “we can cut them anytime” line..Meanwhile the limited number of reps are gone, and you can’t legally get them back. This is a calculated risk here by Pete Carroll.

My question is basically this: When will the Seahawks offense begin to find its identity?

In the past when Pete Carroll went all Madden front office mode with the Seahawks roster I applauded because those moves were needed badly..Now I’m beginning to feel the urge to snatch the controller from his sun tanned hands..

Time will tell if my concern is warranted. I guess it’s time for me to sit back, relax, and enjoy the fireworks with my extra-large tub of popcorn, and try not to choke..

At the end of the day I love my team, and will support them to the end. But just like my parents said to me as a young boy..”Just because I love you, it doesn’t mean I like you at the moment”.

So welcome to Seattle Mr. Owens. Here’s to Seahawk success, and my fears laid to rest.

Go Seahawks!

 

 

 

THE POLL OF THE WEEK: The Apology..Marshawn Lynch episode 1.

The Mug Shot (courtesy TMZ.com)

When Marshawn Lynch was arrested for playing drunken Econoline bumper cars, the 12thMan became completely overrun with anger, disappointment, and sky is falling predictions. These predictions, while over the top and scary, just showed me how much faith and pride Lynch’s “BeastMode” persona have brought to Seattle.

I also heard immediate calls for an apology for wronging us as a fan base.

Buckle up, I’m going to get controversial here… apologies from athletes are pointless, and in my humble opinion we shouldn’t want one.

Pete Carroll knew what he was getting when he signed Marshawn Lynch in 2010. He knew he had weapons charges, a hit and run, and other various issues. This is not an indictment of his character as much as it is his maturity and decision-making. Most individuals with checkered pasts do not change all that much and even when they do their improved behavior will eventually become disrupted by another event. If anyone owes us an apology I would argue the case for Pete Carroll is a much stronger one. One in which I would never pursue.

Earlier today Marshawn Lynch released this statement:

“I want to apologize to my family, the Seattle Seahawks, the NFL and the 12th Man for the negative attention resulting from my recent actions. This is not the type of community leader I have been over the last two years or the one I’m striving to become. I want to assure everyone that I will work to be better and look forward to a very exciting, and very successful season with the Seattle Seahawks.”

Great statement.. Mature, remorseful and also a complete waste of time. I happen to believe Marshawn Lynch is a good guy, and probably is truly sorry for the lives he could have ended, the people he could have hurt, and the injuries he could have inflicted on himself but we will never know for sure. These types of statements serve one purpose, and one purpose only..Damage control.

And that’s my point. These contrived apologies from star athletes are never going to be enough. They are never going to stop a fan base from turning their back or force someone to forgive their transgressions.

But maybe I’m wrong..What do you think?

Mike Williams is gone and all I got was Twitter blocked

Mike Williams.. Former Seattle Seahawks receiver.

It was a rather unlucky Friday the 13th for now-former Seahawks wide receiver Mike Williams as the team announced today they have released him.

Word around the Twitterverse is that Big Mike Williams (also known as “BMW,” which I’m sure really helped his ego) had expected it “for some time now“. I expected it from the day he blocked me on Twitter, but we’ll get to that (so that I may show you just exactly how too seriously I take both 140-character social media and professional athlete maturity. And myself).

In a way, I feel bad for Williams, who had one of those redemptions stories in 2010 fans eat up like stadium nachos. You know, all gooey, messy but you really want more. The only difference is that Williams came cheap to the Seahawks in comparison to those nachos to your wallet.

I, too, was enthralled by the story. Williams, who had basically been blacklisted by NFL teams after becoming overweight and pretentious, had been given a second chance by the Big Man in the Hawks Nest – Pete Carroll. The Seahawks head coach has quickly made a name for himself these few years back in the pros by providing said redemption to lost athletic souls.

And it paid off. Williams was the Seahawks’ top receiver in 2010, with a respectable 65 catches and 751 yards for the team. Big Mike’s size allowed him to win match-ups in the air for catches and he appeared to have hands of steel. Not even a broken finger stopped him from catching nearly everything thrown his way that season.

The 12th Man had found its very own Magic Mike, you know, without all of the body oil, gyration and 40-year-old women screaming for more. Okay, there was probably some of the lady screaming.

But 2011 was a different story. Along with a change in quarterback, which didn’t appear to help, Williams’ production plummeted and he instead became Tragic MIke. Us casual, armchair quarterbacks out in Hawk Land can’t be sure if it was a failure of Williams or mash potatoes QB Tarvaris Jackson not getting him the ball.

Toward the end of the year, Williams left the season with a broken leg.

And now he’s gone. We knew it couldn’t last, the question was whether one more year with the team would bring back that fairy tale BMW we had all grown to love.

Well, at least, most of us had grown to love. You see, Mike Williams blocked me on Twitter last year. It was literally July 2011 when he and I got into a bit of an electronic spat over his attitude on the social media platform.

You see, I take Twitter way too seriously, and I’m a very odd sports fan. Here’s the thing: I believe professional athletes owe some respect to fans, the people who make what they do even possible.

That’s not a sentiment held by a lot of people. Most fans would tell me to shut my face and just watch the game. I can’t do it. In a world where athletes work to brand themselves and demand attention on social networks, I swoop in as some type of hell bent hall monitor calling them out when I think they’re being, well, asshats.

And Mike Williams was an asshat with this tweet:

Image

The rest is lost in the Twitterscape because archiving doesn’t go back that far and I can’t find keywords. But it went something like this:

My response was something very cordial and similar to “I do say, my good man, I take a smidgen of umbrage at your fairly racial tone. Please do appreciate that we’re all created equal and even the fair-skinned folk who have derived from the European continent enjoy watching you on the professional football sport pitch. Huzzah!”

Williams didn’t like my extremely-polite response and tweeted something else along the lines of “Sit on a bowling pin, biiiiiiitch!”

And then I said something along the lines of “blah, blah, blah, you’re an asshole who only cares about money blah, blah, blah.”

The next thing you know, my BFF Big Mike Williams has blocked me. It was an invigorating exchange of mature words, I assure you.

So, for nearly a year, I’ve not had the pleasure of following the “raw” thoughts of this consummate professional. Needless to say, he liked to brag about simply speaking his mind, whereas I thought he could have use a tad bit more humility, considering this was a shot at redemption, and he was not yet a star.

In the grand scheme of things, the argument was trivial, and his blocking of me was simply another day in the life of this armchair quarterback.

But there’s a big difference between Mike Williams and this writer: I still have a stake in the Seattle Seahawks this Friday the 13th.

Now excuse me while I go police Twitter for some athlete using curse words like “darn it” and “shucks.”

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