Commentary, NFL

We Remember

While our team here at The Matchups Zone loves writing about, analyzing, and scouting the Seattle Seahawks, we also recognize the significance of tomorrow’s date.  As a nation we owe it to ourselves, and to those lost, to again confront the reality of that day. Whether by a silent moment of reflection or by way of remarkable and powerful tributes, to remember is a way to honor those lost.

Like many others my personal memories of 9-11 have not faded.  I remember nearly everything about that day and the days that followed.  Those days included a numbing sadness that soon gave way to visceral anger.  The images of that day played in my mind like an unending horror film long after the TV was turned off.  The images of that day still have a place.  Before writing this I spent some time watching video footage and looking at some of the pictures that now memorialize that day.

September 11, 2001 shattered our illusions of security at home and clearly showed that when reason is suspended in favor of a radical and irrational belief, hatred is a rather predictable outcome. But through the debris, fire, and incomprehensible loss, we witnessed thousands of examples of the very best of humanity. Many acts of courage were performed by private citizens and public service workers who ignored the smoke, and intense fire, deciding instead to race up to help those trapped and injured. Hundreds of people were saved by strangers who refused to accept defeat. A small group of remarkable passengers on United flight 93 stood up and fought back. There is no question that they too saved lives that day.  The past decade has also required a great deal of those who serve our military.  Their sacrifice and commitment to our nation deserves to be recognized.

If this short article seems incredibly out-of-place in the context and environment of a blog dedicated to the Seattle Seahawks, then at the very least it should be remembered that immediately following 9-11, the NFL had some very important decisions to make. Due in large part to a push by a number of players, former commissioner Paul Tagliabue postponed games scheduled for the weekend following the attacks of 9-11. On September 23, 2001, the Seahawks–playing at Husky Stadium that season–hosted the Philadelphia Eagles.  The Seahawks lost the game 27-3.  I had to look that up.  What I remember was that it felt like we won that day when we took the field. That is because up until that Sunday many of us felt like we were holding our breath.  The game did nothing to change the reality of 9-11, but it wasn’t supposed to.  It was to me then (and I feel this way now) a few hours of what felt like strained normalcy.  It was something familiar, and something that made sense in a time when little else did.

A decade after 9-11-01 many things have changed. While many wounds remain, we have also had a chance and some of the time necessary to heal. As we remember that day and sift through the most difficult memories, a measure of comfort can be found in the fact that we are not confined by memories of loss alone.  The best of who we are was also on display a decade ago.  And that too is very much worth remembering as we reflect; ten years later.

–The Matchups Zone Team

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About Drew

A dedicated Seahawks fan and proud 12, I love to play drums and live to write. I work in healthcare and believe a good sense of humor is a gift beyond forever.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “We Remember

  1. I was at the Eagles game that day. I didn’t want to be there. I was having a hard time sleeping, let alone stepping out my front door. I’ll never forget being at Husky Stadium that day. The Red Cross handing out ‘How to Deal with Trauma and PTSD’ brochures at the gate (and reading the tic that had developed in my eye the day after the attacks was a normal stress response and would eventually go away ~ which it did three months later). I don’t recall a thing about the game itself but my memories of the entire stadium in tears during the Star Spangled Banner and the sense of community and national pride that permeated every moment of that day are with me still. I’ll never forget it. I’m glad I went. It played a huge part in the my healing process.

    Great article, Drew. Thanks.
    Melissa

    Posted by Melissa | March 11, 2015, 11:06 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Remembering 9-11 « Ed Robinson's Blog - September 11, 2011

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